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Friday, 22 July 2011 12:59
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Communication in Uganda has undergone a revolution in just under a decade thanks to the mobile phone. But, beyond communication, it has bred fresh challenges in marriages and relationships. That small gadget can bring you a good job, a business and create a lot of other opportunities in your life.

 
Friday, 22 July 2011 12:59
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Communication in Uganda has undergone a revolution in just under a decade thanks to the mobile phone. But, beyond communication, it has bred fresh challenges in marriages and relationships. That small gadget can bring you a good job, a business and create a lot of other opportunities in your life. But on another day, it may cost you your marriage, intimate relationship or even life.

Joseph Kamugasha and his wife had been married for seven years. Their marriage had been a bed of roses until Kamugasha’s fondness to his phone reached epidemic proportions. At odd hours of the night at their marital in the Bukoto suburb, he would be secretly texting messages and picking phone calls.

Wherever his phone rang in his wife’s presence, he would excuse himself and get out talking. Other times, he would make the phone busy. It generated suspicion. Suspicion bred mistrust. And complaints flooded.

One night, his wife woke up in the wee hours of the night while the husband was snoring. She scrolled through his phone and found love messages with the phone number saved in a man’s name. Her mission was disrupted when her husband suddenly woke up. He accused her of distrust. A fight ensued. Since that day, six months ago, their marriage has been on the rocks. Their marital bliss, love and trust of close to a decade melted like ice under a scorching sun

Kamugasha’s marriage is just an example of the hundreds of thousands of relationships shot down by the mobile phone.

Phionah Akello, a student at Makerere University, separated with her boyfriend over the same cause. “He was always checking my phone, asking who had called me,” says Akello.

This phone “espionage” is cross-gender. Irene, a housewife in Kewempe suburb, would put her phone in silence while at home. Her husband Ronald Mukasa became suspicious there were certain people she was avoiding to talk to when he is around. One time he stealthily checked her phonebook and found romantic messages from a particular person. The disturbed Mukasa talked to her about it. She stopped it.

Stephen Langa, the Executive Director of Family Life Network, a local NGO working on restoration of family morality, the biggest cause of marriage feuds he has handled is couples checking each other’s phones and finding suspicious messages.

Anne Asimwe Muzigiwa, a counsellor at Care Counselling Centre in Bukoto, advises couples to stay away from their spouse’s phone.  However, Langa does not agree with this counsel. He holds that honest and faithful couples allow their spouses full access to their phones.

Asimwe cites her recent client who broke up with his wife because he had followed her and hidden somewhere when she was picking a certain call from outside. He grabbed the phone from her and called the person on the same phone. He discovered the person was his wife’s former boyfriend.

Asimwe counsels that though you may be married, you should respect each other’s privacy.

Patricia Achipa, a counselor with The AIDS Support Organisation at Mulago admits that phone espionage has become a major cause of broken relationships and marriages. She cites a couple who quarrelled at a friend’s home they had visited. The wife started checking in her husband’s phone while he was chatting with his peer a distance away. Upon finding his wife perusing his phonebook, Patricia says, “The man turned wild.”

A lady in her mid 20s, who declined to be named, told The Independent that her sister is has separated with her husband of three years because of the former’s phone spying etiquette. She says her sister got married but kept phone communication with her previous lovers. Sensing this would cause discomfort to her husband, Susan (not her real name) started putting her phone in silent tone wherever she was at home. The trick did not work. It instead ignited more anxiety and trouble when her husband discovered the trick and the many missed calls on her phone.

Doreen, a secretary at a Church in Bugolobi, told The Independent that her husband’s secretive phone strained their relationship when she answered a call from a lady who called her husband when he had just arrived home after two weeks in field work upcountry. “He got mad and asked me why I had picked the call without his permission,” says Doreen.

Looking back, Doreen confirms that spouses’ secrecy over phones can spoil relationships. “If your partner denies you access to their phone, know there is something wrong. But if he allows you to pick his calls, know there is no mischief,” she reasons.

On 7th January 2007, Kenyan writer Gakiha Weru wrote in Kilili 5, an online edition, that an opinion poll by the Sunday Nation revealed that for many a couple, spying on each other has become a fulltime pre-occupation. Many relationships are falling apart courtesy of the small gadget.

The poll shows that 47.3 per cent of the respondents had been actively engaged in domestic espionage in the last three months. Psychologists, marriage counsellors and the church have their hands full trying to restore harmony among couples whose marriages have been put to the test by a spouse’s tendency to scroll through the partner’s messages.

The mobile phone is rivaling Facebook in cyber space causes of divorce and broken marriages.

According to a recent survey of U.S. divorce attorneys, Facebook is the “unrivaled leader” for online evidence of matrimonial naughtiness. The survey by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers shows that 81 percent of the Academy’s members in the past five years have seen an increase in the number of divorce cases using social networking evidence. Facebook has the dubious honour of being the leader for online divorce dirt, with 66 percent of survey respondents citing it as the primary source.

Phone “espionage” is part of the larger and complex problem caused by the Communication Revolution. Beware of that small cellular gadget.

The small gadget that has ruined marriages

Communication in Uganda has undergone a revolution in just under a decade thanks to the mobile phone. But, beyond communication, it has bred fresh challenges in marriages and relationships. That small gadget can bring you a good job, a business and create a lot of other opportunities in your life. But on another day, it may cost you your marriage, intimate relationship or even life.

Joseph Kamugasha and his wife had been married for seven years. Their marriage had been a bed of roses until Kamugasha’s fondness to his phone reached epidemic proportions. At odd hours of the night at their marital in the Bukoto suburb, he would be secretly texting messages and picking phone calls.

Wherever his phone rang in his wife’s presence, he would excuse himself and get out talking. Other times, he would make the phone busy. It generated suspicion. Suspicion bred mistrust. And complaints flooded.

One night, his wife woke up in the wee hours of the night while the husband was snoring. She scrolled through his phone and found love messages with the phone number saved in a man’s name. Her mission was disrupted when her husband suddenly woke up. He accused her of distrust. A fight ensued. Since that day, six months ago, their marriage has been on the rocks. Their marital bliss, love and trust of close to a decade melted like ice under a scorching sun

Kamugasha’s marriage is just an example of the hundreds of thousands of relationships shot down by the mobile phone.

Phionah Akello, a student at Makerere University, separated with her boyfriend over the same cause. “He was always checking my phone, asking who had called me,” says Akello.

This phone “espionage” is cross-gender. Irene, a housewife in Kewempe suburb, would put her phone in silence while at home. Her husband Ronald Mukasa became suspicious there were certain people she was avoiding to talk to when he is around. One time he stealthily checked her phonebook and found romantic messages from a particular person. The disturbed Mukasa talked to her about it. She stopped it.

Stephen Langa, the Executive Director of Family Life Network, a local NGO working on restoration of family morality, the biggest cause of marriage feuds he has handled is couples checking each other’s phones and finding suspicious messages.

Anne Asimwe Muzigiwa, a counsellor at Care Counselling Centre in Bukoto, advises couples to stay away from their spouse’s phone.  However, Langa does not agree with this counsel. He holds that honest and faithful couples allow their spouses full access to their phones.

Asimwe cites her recent client who broke up with his wife because he had followed her and hidden somewhere when she was picking a certain call from outside. He grabbed the phone from her and called the person on the same phone. He discovered the person was his wife’s former boyfriend.

Asimwe counsels that though you may be married, you should respect each other’s privacy.

Patricia Achipa, a counselor with The AIDS Support Organisation at Mulago admits that phone espionage has become a major cause of broken relationships and marriages. She cites a couple who quarrelled at a friend’s home they had visited. The wife started checking in her husband’s phone while he was chatting with his peer a distance away. Upon finding his wife perusing his phonebook, Patricia says, “The man turned wild.”

A lady in her mid 20s, who declined to be named, told The Independent that her sister is has separated with her husband of three years because of the former’s phone spying etiquette. She says her sister got married but kept phone communication with her previous lovers. Sensing this would cause discomfort to her husband, Susan (not her real name) started putting her phone in silent tone wherever she was at home. The trick did not work. It instead ignited more anxiety and trouble when her husband discovered the trick and the many missed calls on her phone.

Doreen, a secretary at a Church in Bugolobi, told The Independent that her husband’s secretive phone strained their relationship when she answered a call from a lady who called her husband when he had just arrived home after two weeks in field work upcountry. “He got mad and asked me why I had picked the call without his permission,” says Doreen.

Looking back, Doreen confirms that spouses’ secrecy over phones can spoil relationships. “If your partner denies you access to their phone, know there is something wrong. But if he allows you to pick his calls, know there is no mischief,” she reasons.

On 7th January 2007, Kenyan writer Gakiha Weru wrote in Kilili 5, an online edition, that an opinion poll by the Sunday Nation revealed that for many a couple, spying on each other has become a fulltime pre-occupation. Many relationships are falling apart courtesy of the small gadget.

The poll shows that 47.3 per cent of the respondents had been actively engaged in domestic espionage in the last three months. Psychologists, marriage counsellors and the church have their hands full trying to restore harmony among couples whose marriages have been put to the test by a spouse’s tendency to scroll through the partner’s messages.

The mobile phone is rivaling Facebook in cyber space causes of divorce and broken marriages.

According to a recent survey of U.S. divorce attorneys, Facebook is the “unrivaled leader” for online evidence of matrimonial naughtiness. The survey by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers shows that 81 percent of the Academy’s members in the past five years have seen an increase in the number of divorce cases using social networking evidence. Facebook has the dubious honour of being the leader for online divorce dirt, with 66 percent of survey respondents citing it as the primary source.

Phone “espionage” is part of the larger and complex problem caused by the Communication Revolution. Beware of that small cellular gadget.

 

The small gadget that has ruined marriages

Communication in Uganda has undergone a revolution in just under a decade thanks to the mobile phone. But, beyond communication, it has bred fresh challenges in marriages and relationships. That small gadget can bring you a good job, a business and create a lot of other opportunities in your life. But on another day, it may cost you your marriage, intimate relationship or even life.

Joseph Kamugasha and his wife had been married for seven years. Their marriage had been a bed of roses until Kamugasha’s fondness to his phone reached epidemic proportions. At odd hours of the night at their marital in the Bukoto suburb, he would be secretly texting messages and picking phone calls.

Wherever his phone rang in his wife’s presence, he would excuse himself and get out talking. Other times, he would make the phone busy. It generated suspicion. Suspicion bred mistrust. And complaints flooded.

One night, his wife woke up in the wee hours of the night while the husband was snoring. She scrolled through his phone and found love messages with the phone number saved in a man’s name. Her mission was disrupted when her husband suddenly woke up. He accused her of distrust. A fight ensued. Since that day, six months ago, their marriage has been on the rocks. Their marital bliss, love and trust of close to a decade melted like ice under a scorching sun

Kamugasha’s marriage is just an example of the hundreds of thousands of relationships shot down by the mobile phone.

Phionah Akello, a student at Makerere University, separated with her boyfriend over the same cause. “He was always checking my phone, asking who had called me,” says Akello.

This phone “espionage” is cross-gender. Irene, a housewife in Kewempe suburb, would put her phone in silence while at home. Her husband Ronald Mukasa became suspicious there were certain people she was avoiding to talk to when he is around. One time he stealthily checked her phonebook and found romantic messages from a particular person. The disturbed Mukasa talked to her about it. She stopped it.

Stephen Langa, the Executive Director of Family Life Network, a local NGO working on restoration of family morality, the biggest cause of marriage feuds he has handled is couples checking each other’s phones and finding suspicious messages.

Anne Asimwe Muzigiwa, a counsellor at Care Counselling Centre in Bukoto, advises couples to stay away from their spouse’s phone.  However, Langa does not agree with this counsel. He holds that honest and faithful couples allow their spouses full access to their phones.

Asimwe cites her recent client who broke up with his wife because he had followed her and hidden somewhere when she was picking a certain call from outside. He grabbed the phone from her and called the person on the same phone. He discovered the person was his wife’s former boyfriend.

Asimwe counsels that though you may be married, you should respect each other’s privacy.

Patricia Achipa, a counselor with The AIDS Support Organisation at Mulago admits that phone espionage has become a major cause of broken relationships and marriages. She cites a couple who quarrelled at a friend’s home they had visited. The wife started checking in her husband’s phone while he was chatting with his peer a distance away. Upon finding his wife perusing his phonebook, Patricia says, “The man turned wild.”

A lady in her mid 20s, who declined to be named, told The Independent that her sister is has separated with her husband of three years because of the former’s phone spying etiquette. She says her sister got married but kept phone communication with her previous lovers. Sensing this would cause discomfort to her husband, Susan (not her real name) started putting her phone in silent tone wherever she was at home. The trick did not work. It instead ignited more anxiety and trouble when her husband discovered the trick and the many missed calls on her phone.

Doreen, a secretary at a Church in Bugolobi, told The Independent that her husband’s secretive phone strained their relationship when she answered a call from a lady who called her husband when he had just arrived home after two weeks in field work upcountry. “He got mad and asked me why I had picked the call without his permission,” says Doreen.

Looking back, Doreen confirms that spouses’ secrecy over phones can spoil relationships. “If your partner denies you access to their phone, know there is something wrong. But if he allows you to pick his calls, know there is no mischief,” she reasons.

On 7th January 2007, Kenyan writer Gakiha Weru wrote in Kilili 5, an online edition, that an opinion poll by the Sunday Nation revealed that for many a couple, spying on each other has become a fulltime pre-occupation. Many relationships are falling apart courtesy of the small gadget.

The poll shows that 47.3 per cent of the respondents had been actively engaged in domestic espionage in the last three months. Psychologists, marriage counsellors and the church have their hands full trying to restore harmony among couples whose marriages have been put to the test by a spouse’s tendency to scroll through the partner’s messages.

The mobile phone is rivaling Facebook in cyber space causes of divorce and broken marriages.

According to a recent survey of U.S. divorce attorneys, Facebook is the “unrivaled leader” for online evidence of matrimonial naughtiness. The survey by the American Academy of Matrimonial Lawyers shows that 81 percent of the Academy’s members in the past five years have seen an increase in the number of divorce cases using social networking evidence. Facebook has the dubious honour of being the leader for online divorce dirt, with 66 percent of survey respondents citing it as the primary source.

Phone “espionage” is part of the larger and complex problem caused by the Communication Revolution. Beware of that small cellular gadget.

 
Friday, 22 July 2011 12:51
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A Kyeyune classic Vs Oloya’s modernity

I was scrolling through Art Uganda’s wall photos on Ugandan artists on FaceBook and could not help but marvel at the leap in variation over the years. The differences in execution, subject matter, and project types that Ugandan artists have been involved in - and with whom, are amazing.

 
Friday, 15 July 2011 09:54
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Sometimes when you drive at speeds over 40 km/hour, you feel the steering wheel suddenly start­ing to vibrate. This is even when your tyres are still in good condition and free of bulges and damaged threads. Sometimes you will feel slight vibra­tions but at other times you could hear thundering sound which only stops when you slow down.

When you drive at high speed, you must know that the balance of each wheel and tyres are very important. Wheels will begin to vibrate if they are out of balance. The vibration is trans­mitted to the steering linkage and the suspension that holds the wheels to the car. If wheel-balance vibration is left unrepaired, the life span of the front and rear suspension will reduce. Apart from that, a wheel-balance vibration also causes premature tyre wear, tyre failure and damage to tyre tread.

 
Friday, 15 July 2011 09:52
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The current political malaises, the religious and tribal lobbying for powerful representatives in the government and parliament are all a deliberate creation of the British. That is the message in a new book `Parliamentary Democracy in Uganda: the experiment that failed’, written by Baganchwera N.I. Barungi.

Having been the first Ugandan to hold the post of Clerk to the National Assembly- what Parliament was called before independence in 1962 – Barungi tells the story of how parliament in Uganda was formed and the nationalist aspirations of the first political party in Uganda, the Uganda National Congress (UNC), from the perspective of someone who was there.

 
Saturday, 09 July 2011 07:10
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Spoilers are stylish and are greatly admired by many drivers, especially the young ones who try to pimp their rides to be the best in town. Spoilers add extra beauty to yo

ur vehicle and may turn your ordinary ride into a sporty vehicle and even give you the coolest ride around town.

However, much as many people admire the spoilers and fit them on their vehicle, many do not know that apart from making the vehicle look good, spoilers also improve on the vehicles aerodynamics, improve safety at high speeds, and improve fuel efficiency.

 
Friday, 01 July 2011 08:33
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Ssemogerere’s book on public funding of parties criticises the Constitution, EC

Reality CheckVeteran politician and two time presidential candidate, Dr. Paul Kawanga Ssemogerere, has written a book critiquing political party funding in Uganda.

The critique; Reality Check: Political Party Financing in Uganda, is based on three issues – the ideological/philosophical/legal orientation of the public funding system; its administering authority; and its control component.

Public financing of political parties, Ssemogerere says, is a “moral obligation for the State in a democracy to empower the citizenry to freely exercise their basic human rights to political expression, association and assembly.”

But, he says, the framework for public funding of political parties in Uganda, which was instituted in 2010, is biased in favour of the ruling party because it positions it to receive a disproportionate share of the resources available to political parties and to dominate the appointment of the Electoral Commission (EC), the body responsible for managing the funds.

He says the EC is ‘inherently biased’ to the ruling party and cannot fairly manage the political parties’ fund because the President, who is also the head of the ruling party, initiates the process of appointing commissioners by submitting nominations to Parliament for approval, which is itself dominated by ruling party members.

 
Friday, 01 July 2011 08:17
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The cooling system employed in your vehicle, as in all automobiles, is a very vital system because it helps in heat dissipation from engine parts and helps them to operate under a specific temperature.

Most internal combustion engines produce mechanical energy because of the combustion of air and fuel mixtures but as this mechanic energy is generated, heat energy is also generated and there is need to extract the excess waste heat such that the engine can continue operating without overheating.

The best cooling media is water because of its state of matter and ability to flow with limited expansion helps it to conduct heat and dissipate it very fast.

However, the system should be free from air spaces to prevent boiling and evaporation to create steam that can cause the engine to overheat.

That aside, water alone is very corrosive and can cause rusting and scaling in the engine. Furthermore, the freezing point and the boiling point of water are a bit low, making it possible to freeze or boil if the temperatures go to the extreme. So there is need to increase the boiling point and freezing point such that the vehicle can still move under these extreme conditions of temperature.

 
Thursday, 23 June 2011 12:00
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There is nothing like the panic of a drowning person as they look for something to hang on but find only water whenever they desperately throw their hands about. That is the one thing I can compare to when the brakes of a vehicle fail. You step so hard on that pedal but the vehicle just moves faster. You start to sweat and shiver at the same time. You become speechless. Sometimes you die.

Brakes play a very vital role in a motor vehicle in terms of safety because they are what bring the vehicle to a stop when it is moving. They help in parking the vehicle thus the `parking brake’ commonly known to some as the `hand brake’. Remember there are also foot parking brakes. Unfortunately, brakes can fail any time so they require frequent inspection. At every routine lubrication service they should be inspected.

 

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