Google+
Saturday 29th of November 2014 10:13:12 AM
 

You buy the Truth, we pay the Price
Banner
 

Who will succeed China?

E-mail Print PDF

East Africa has been billed as the next manufacturing hub for global markets. Will our politics allow it?

The South Korean ambassador to Uganda, Park Jong Dae, recently referred me to an article by George Friedman in the online journal, Geopolitical Weekly titled The PC16: Identifying China’s Successors. I became an admirer of Friedman’s work after reading his intellectually stimulating book, TheNext 100 Years; A Forecast for the 21st Century. He has an interesting way of looking at future global trends.

China has enjoyed fast economic growth averaging 10% per annum for over 35 years by making itself the hub for the manufacture of cheap products for global markets based on low wages. However, Friedman believes that China’s growth has reached its zenith and henceforth will be declining. This is because labour costs have started rising in China, thus reducing the competitiveness of her manufactured exports. China’s future growth will come from changing the structure of its economy into high-wage high-value goods hence leaving poorer countries to export cheap manufactures.

As Friedman says, the world is already seeing a continual flow of companies leaving China, or choosing not to invest in China, and going to these countries. “This flow is now quickening,” Friedman argues,“The first impetus is the desire of global entrepreneurs, usually fairly small businesses themselves, to escape the increasingly non-competitive wages and business environment of the previous growth giant. Large, complex enterprises can’t move fast and can’t use the labour force of the emerging countries because it is untrained in every way. The businesses that make the move are smaller, with small amounts of capital involved and therefore lower risk. These are fast moving, labour-intensive businesses that make their living looking for the lowest cost labour with some organisation, some order and available export facilities.”

The PC16 (Post China 16) refers to sixteen countries that Friedman thinks will replace China in the low wage manufactures. Friedman argues that a significant share of the post-China manufacturing activity is going to be based on the Indian Ocean Basin. “The most interesting pattern is the eastern edge of Sub-Sahara Africa: Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and Ethiopia. To this he adds Sri Lanka, Indonesia, Myanmar and Bangladesh which are also directly on the Indian Ocean. After these come the Indochinese countries of Vietnam, Cambodia, Laos and the Philippines around the South China Sea. These are followed by Peru, Dominican Republic, Nicaragua and Mexico in Latin America.

If we accept Friedman’s assessment as realistic, then our region is sitting on a huge geographical advantage. However, the existence of an opportunity does not necessarily mean that a country or region will take advantage of it. Bad politics can lead to economically destructive public policies as has happened in North Korea over the last 50 years. Its neighbour, South Korea, has transformed from a poor nation into a highly industrialised country. Indeed, bad politics can lead to civil wars and even the dismemberment of a country. So the question is: Is East African well positioned politically to benefit from the changing structure of the Chinese economy?

Let us begin with the basics: a country needs a policy environment conducive for businesses to invest and make money. East Africa already has this since it liberalised and deregulated its economy. Second, we need an educated population that can easily be given skills to produce low value manufactured products like toys, shoes and clothes and assembling cheap mobile phone handsets. Basic education is critical in performing such tasks. Over the last 15 years, free primary and secondary education in this region has produced a large mass of unemployed yet educated youths.

The third basic need is energy and infrastructure. Without affordable and reliable electricity, roads, seaports, airports and railways, a country cannot move its products to markets overseas. Investment in these areas has picked a pace lately. Ethiopia is investing in producing 10.000MW of electricity, building high ways and trains; and Uganda has signed Karuma, Ayago and Isimba with a combined output of about 2.000 MW of hydro power. The leaders of Kenya, Uganda and Rwanda have signed a multibillion dollar contract to build a standard gauge railway linking the three countries leaving Tanzania behind. Rwanda and Uganda are planning new international airports while Kenya has joined them in planning road construction projects on a massive scale. Tanzania is doing the same. All this is good news.

Within the meaning of what is commonly called neoclassical economics, this is all the state needs to do – provide the right market friendly policies and build the public goods necessary for the private sector to operate smoothly and leave the rest to markets. However, transformative projects that drive development in poor countries require capital investments far in excess of what domestic private capital can command. As historical experience shows, international capital does not develop nations precisely because it lacks the necessary social ties with the surrounding society to effectively influence politics to promote and sustain public policies and political institutions that ensure rapid change. It can only lobby for reform.

Therefore poor countries need to develop industrial policies. This involves three elements. First the state has to mobilise long term savings to finance long term transformative investments (that is why pension reform is an absolute necessity). Second, the state needs to reduce risks to private capital holders so that it can entice them to make investments they would otherwise have not made. Picking winners and allocating cheap credit, tax waivers and subsidies is necessary. But it is politically contentious as governments give such benefits to their cronies than the deserving (although the two are not mutually exclusive). Third, the state has to become a venture capitalist by allocating money to sectors it thinks can create what Albert Hischman called “a multidimensional conspiracy in favour of development.”

However the challenge is whether our governments have the audacity to pursue such hard-nosed choices. There would also be domestic opposition as the allocation of cheap credit, subsidies, and tax waivers inevitably go to regime cronies. This makes it seem unfair even when the beneficiaries merit support. Besides, if the state plays the role of venture capital, can it sustain it politically? In venture capital dynamics, if two out of 10 projects turn out successful, that is considered excellent performance. But can our politics allow the state to lose public money on eight investments out of ten? Ethiopia and Rwanda can and are already doing this. But can Tanzania, Uganda and Kenya which are more democratised afford and sustain such policies?

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Comments (43)Add Comment
...
written by Gen Adam Kifaliso, July 06, 2014
Andrew , hehehehe you are again mixing facts up ....dictatorship won't favour economic growth in Rwanda and Ethiopia as you say ...it works contrally...m7 never liberalised the economy in Uganda ...in fact he set up a trap in the Uganda Revenue Authority ....Andrew take for instance the 10% tax on money transfers in this digital era ....does this favour the economy ? containers of goods are virtually confiscated on the borders by corrupt URA officials.. Uganda's local economy is in fact fake and unproductive relying on foreign donor cash as source of foreign exchange ..How many businesses has Kagina destroyed ? do you know Andrew ..? milking a cow you don't feed ....is not nnice
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 07, 2014
Is East Africa the next China? On the contrary, it is evidently clear with capitalist communities that there is no bigger market for capitalist enterprises than their own employees. The mechanisation of textile production created growing employment opportunities for Western workers albeit at the expense of Indian Spinners and Weavers. This piece of fact renders both Mwenda and his "fantasy friend" Friedman prophecy- a mere torso. I will make an exception and give an account of what China was and what Uganda is not, nor its neighbouring countries. China boosts of a continental economy of 1.3billion people. The implication of this, is that China "exports" to its very people.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 07, 2014
Far from what Andrew and his neo-capitalists want the world to believe is that, China's success story did not start with the "liberalisation" of its economy, three decades ago. Gugong city (Forbidden city) was built in the heart of Beijing by more than a million people using materials all made by Chinese way back in the 15th century. With nearly 1,000 buildings arranged, constructed and decorated to symbolise the might of the Ming dynasty. In 2000, almost six centuries after the construction of the Guong city, the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) was formed (famous for its virgin girls in Uganda, its intention was to transform the hugely subsistence economies of the sub-saharan Africa).
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 07, 2014
In 2007, Uganda received about $2 billion in multilateral and bilateral debt relief. It also received $10 million for a Millennium Challenge Account Threshold Program. However, its trade balance with the United States in 2012 was about $60 million. In 2008, Tanzania received the world's largest Millennium Challenge Compact grant, worth $698 million, and in December 2012 the Millennium Challenge Corporation selected Tanzania for a second Compact. However, its trade balance with the U.S was just over $100 million. Rwanda continues to receive substantial aid money and it obtained the IMF-World Bank Heavily Indebted Poor Country (HIPC) initiative debt relief in 2005-06.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 07, 2014
The reason I give these facts is to emphasise the contradiction that Mwenda makes in here- "As historical experience shows, international capital does not develop nations precisely because it lacks the necessary social ties with the surrounding society to effectively influence politics to promote and sustain public policies and political institutions that ensure rapid change. It can only lobby for reform." However, the region (East Africa) that Mwenda is betting to become the next China, is fully reliant on foreign aid. The exports that are/were for AGOA, the raw materials are/were being imported. The girls were at the time being abused in all form of manner and no justice accorded.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 07, 2014
The AGOA project suffered a natural death right at its birth. With the exception of Ethiopia where land is owned by government, East Africa is a region largely fragmented, a region hugely embroiled in political wars and instability, a region short on both, mental and physical manpower to run a meaningful and sustainable revolution. We are not going to transform into China simply because of "Mobile money" and a few construction and power projects which on the whole, are mere extensions of the "Chinese economic empire." I know Friedman has made U-turns in his philosophies before, what I am not sure of, is whether he has made his last?
...
written by Tina, July 07, 2014
1. The world and the level of Technology and Economic development has taken many dimensions it is even being more expensive in the long run to buy goods from china you may buy 10 pairs of shoes at 50,000/= and use them 5 months yet if you spared some money and bought a European made shoe it would last you probably 3 years though at a high cost so where is the logic?there are economies that Africa should pattern with like America for rubber production but the question still remains are these bigt economies willing to pattern with Africa?
...
written by Tina, July 07, 2014
2. A good example is how we shot ourselves in the foot and even ended up in court without a drop of oil being sold coz of negotiations and deals that we thought were poorly negotiated as if we even had the technical competence to verify them the government needs to listen more to technical advise.
3. There is need for openness with both investors and govts in Africa(please avoid behind scene negotiations with brokers and middlemen they make some businesses look fraudulent even if its a good deal.
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 07, 2014
Dear Friends, I have been away to Uganda’s greater north (Karamoja, Acholi/Lango and West Nile) on a study/research about changing land patterns, with focus on national and local policy advocacy and implementation actors. I have been too consumed (in the study) to spare time to drop a comment. I am only baffled by Andrew and Friedman’s assessment of post-China successors and how on earth they arrived on countries like Uganda and Tanzania, with exception of Kenya and somehow Ethiopia. Find details at
http://www.peacebuilding.no/Themes/Emerging-powers/Publications/African-emerging-powers
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 07, 2014
I say baffled because I opened The Independent immediately after reading a more intellectually and factually stimulating piece by NOREF (Norwegian Peacebuilding Centre), titled “African Emerging Powers,” just released this July 2014. In its list NOREF includes South Arica, Nigeria, Angola, and Kenya and explores, with convincing depth, reasons for optimism and pessimism regarding their considerable potential. How the three missed on Friedman’s list is incredible, especially given that Andrew does not present Friedman’s rationale for including Uganda and Tanzania except for his own neo-classical assessment.
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 07, 2014
I have forwarded the NOREF report to Andrew to challenge his rather inflated reading into and admiration Friedman’s works.
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 07, 2014
The link provided above is not about the study we've been undertaking in northern Uganda but links you to the full NOREF report. I am sure those interested in the future of Africa will find it informative.
...
written by Ocheto, July 07, 2014
The answer is one word: culture of corruption. India would be the most immediate replacement and successor to China but like many African countries it is crippled with a sub-culture of corruption and unscrupulousness. Moreover Africa and India will individually will outpace China as global populations centers. No corporation would want to invest in countries with high costs of doing business orchestrated by corrupt bureaucracies, their nightmarish red tape practices, not to mention a heavy tax burden to support the corrupt political class, all conspire to become a bane and an albatross to business.
...
written by OPIO, July 08, 2014
MUSINGUZI welcome back from that trip in northern uganda, i hope u saw how real ugandans live and how far back we still are as a country unlike Anderw M9 who seems to be soo out of touch with reality. Myself at the weekend i went to check out this music fete at Uganda Museum called BLANKETS AND WINE. Apart from a few expertriates, here was the cream of the upperclass elite of our ugandan society. Most of them were young pple who live nearby in the upperclass kololo areas. Lots of them were just back for summer holidays from universities abroad. From chatting with them, these pple all seemed to live a life a million miles far removed from the rest of the average ugandans life.
...
written by OPIO, July 08, 2014
im not tribalist or class envious but what i also noticed is that about 90% were BAHIMA/BANYARWANDA. Is this tribal thing really sustainable in a country like uganda. To have a upper class entirely based on tribe while at the bottom the rest of ugandans things r getting worse everyday. R we not going backwards again ???
...
written by Gen Adam Kifaliso, July 08, 2014
Opio remember sometime back Kololo upper class was also once populated by Opios , Obotes, Ocheings and their Rwandese affiliates ....Even Andrew a man who used to carry his metallic suitcase box from Wairaka to Hoima is now a land lord in Kololo after conning the Queen of Toro in a land deal
I'm not into tribalism like m7 and Kayihura who think every policeman must come from their village . Can you remember the days Andrew used to survive by stealing Mehta's sugarcane while studying at Mwiri Collage
...
written by Winnie, July 08, 2014
1. Andrew may you be blessed beyond your imagination this is a brilliant topic please do Africa a favor and also bring sanity to S.Sudan the world really believes in you.
2.Uganda is very ready for an economic blast like a woman ready for marriage we have all characteristics of a promising nation thanks to M7.
3. The good thing is that M7 listens to only technical advise from former Budo students they normally give him honest advise let me congratulate Kiryowa Kiwanuka and Kuteesa upon their latest appointment to distinguished offices ( of course it has to be a Budo OB to beak such records not the likes of Ssemujjus's who broke the record of being the 1st to be thrown out of parliament.
for economic takeoff
...
written by Miriam Annoyed , July 08, 2014
This is a useless thing to say. We don't need anymore inequality. What we need now is not continuing to degrade ourselves in the name of "development" This was the least critical things I have read yet, how disappointing. The world is ripe for an agreement on fair pay for workers. It can happen it is a basic right, competing for global inequality won't get us anywhere. Think harder!
...
written by Omeros, July 09, 2014
So you are a welfarist after all - just of the corporate variety rather than the social kind. Surely government has to be more than merely a giant private equity fund with an army. What incentive do citizens have to pay their taxes if their contributions do nothing more than underwrite the market risk of the corporate sector? Is the social contract not likely to be rescinded if government's only beneficiaries are seen to be the captains of industry whose capital the public protects while the fates of ordinary citizens are left to the vagaries of the market? Can government be so minimal (after neoclassical doctrine) and retain popular legitimacy?
...
written by Yoga Adhola., July 09, 2014
Gen Adam Kifaliso: One of Obote's greatest mistakes was to appoint a disproportionate number of Banyankole as cabinet Ministers. Take a trip back in history and you will find how true what I am saying is. He should have appointed the Os in these positions as you have said to Opio. Unfortunately the m an was so naive. He thought it pays to be nationalistic. Museveni has proved him totally wrong.
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 09, 2014
I understand Opio's and Adhola's sentiment. Apart from the LRA effect, it's inexplicable that some of Uganda's oldest districts like Moroto, Kotido, Kitgum, Pader, Moyo etc have not seem tarmac 50 years after independence, and just a handful of northern Uganda districts only recently have had access to hydro-electricity! Apart from the foreign and corruption-driven mushrooming Kampala and a few other towns, it is incredible and laughable that Andrew gains courage to include Uganda on China's successors. It's not that I don't wish Uganda well, it is because the reality on the ground militates against any logic of holding and passionately defending, as Andrew did, such fraud assumption.
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 09, 2014
Just to give you a little snapshot into our research in northern Uganda on land: the incessant land and resource disputes over the promise of oil in West Nile; crazy land grabbing and incursions of pastoralists from Western Uganda (God forgive my birthplace!) into Lango (and Teso); and ridiculous land grabbing and gazettement in Karamoja are all a recipe for trouble, not success. How can one explain gazetting of land in Karamoja, where 54% of the land is reserved for wild-life conservation, 24.8 for mineral exploration, 12% for forest reserve, leaving about 10% available for cultivation?
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 09, 2014
Would anyone find it surprising that people in Karamoja are not sure whether to choose between gazzetment or degazzetment since the outcome is the same: the land getting into the hands not of the community but opportunistic land grabbers who hold a stake in government? Our country needs to heal, but our leaders are busy drawing us into further trouble and mayhem! Should we remain proud hiding our heads in the sand and chorusing with Friedman how Uganda is the next world's superpower? Where's your soul Mr. Mwenda? Is it that you're oblivious of these facts or you choose the comfort of your neo-classic paternalism if for anything but as its beneficiary?
...
written by Denis Musinguzi, July 09, 2014
Coming from Western Uganda is now akin to criminality despite that a huge percentage of such people are too detached from government to merit social reprisal! And the polarization is only getting worse. Yes, Adhola and Opio understand too my sentiment how I have to painfully explain, even within a University faculty where I work, how only a few of Westerners hold a stake in government, how Uganda's leading opposition figures are actually from the west, and how it is fallacious to hold that MUSI-nguzi, because he shares initials and cultural ties with MUSE-veni, therefore must be in cohort? We all owe this country sincere reflection, constructive criticism and sincere commitment at changing our mindset-ultimately our way of doing things!.
...
written by Winnie, July 09, 2014
1. Ugandans can only develop by meeting and socializing with people who have value. meet and share ideas with people who are good.
2.It serves Brazil right from the start they even did not want to host the World cup they behaved like those morale boosters of Besigye in Kiseka market. during the game i thought Brazil was given 5 red cards they should investigate whether the team was properly constituted(with the right number of players they looked fewer).
3.I cant believe that even mzee Adhola has joined the tribalism nonsense you should be ashamed of yourself thank you.
4. My Team is Netherlands i have even bought 2 goats to roast as i wait for them to lift the world cup on Sunday.
...
written by Maceni, July 09, 2014
Any sane observer would have no doubt that the NRM government is systematically sectarian and corrupt. From the beginning NRM acquired mass allegiance – by exploiting a widely shared anti- Nilotic passions among vast majority Bantu population because violence exhibited by Amin’s armies and to a large extent Obote’s -which was explained as intrinsically ethnic in character .The NRM was built by mobilizing cohesion around the idea of a more ‘civilized’ Bantu south and savage and violent – Nilotic north – to date this still informs its character!
...
written by Maceni, July 09, 2014
The form of sectarianism the NRM government has propagated is a very different form from that practiced by past governments (and all governments in Uganda have been sectarian) – it has a racialized dimension – many Ugandans outside of western Uganda – cannot put their arms around this concept—but its at the heart of political identity in western Uganda. .and explains a lot of the politics between the NRM and FDC. The politics of NRM and FDC– is basically a regional quarrel that has been nationalized. It’s not a divergence of ideology (there is very little ideological distinction between the NRM and FDC). Lets just be honest about the reality!!
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 10, 2014
I I will disagree with Yoga Adhola's claim that Milton Obote was "nationalistic" and I will lump it with Maceni's, that FDC's politics is NRM's politics. The malady with these two claims is that both have tended to rely on the "outlook" rather than the "principle." On the outlook Obote could have been nationalistic but in principal he was as ethnic as the spell went. After acknowledging him as Prime minister, Obote exclaimed that he had "finished" Mutesa and Buganda. After ousting him from the presidency, Obote is quoted as asking "where was his army? Referring to the national army as his own. Obote had surely "finished" Mutesa but as fate would have it, his copse had to be flown back to Koboko as he, himself died in exile.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 10, 2014
I meant "Dokoro" and not "Koboko" sorry for the mistake but the similarity is evident. Apart from that President Museveni and Dr. Besigye hail from western Uganda, their ideologies different. Museveni believes in "winner takes it all" Besigye believes in "natural justice." Museveni believes in "absolutism" while Besigye believes in "humility." This is evidently clear given the fact that even when Dr. Besigye was still popular within his party he relinquished power before the expiry of his term yet his counterpart does not "see" any visionary leader within the NRM after almost 30yrs at the helm.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 10, 2014
I think it was "Akokoro!!!" It should be the Ramathan!!!
...
written by Mutungisa Wence, July 10, 2014
A very insightful article here, me as a student of economics, Mwenda you have touched what we call classical economics. You as an analyst, you have demonstrated the influence of politics in this. As an economist, I wonder if this can be achieved with our leaders focused more on power retention than development bearing in mind that power retention comes with the heavy burden of patronage corruption and a like. Rwanda like you say can manage this economic transformation because they don't have politics of Patronage.
...
written by Maceni, July 10, 2014
If Anti- Musevenism can be called an ideology -- thats really all the FDC has. It lacks well articulated vision for the country that is outside of simply negating everything Museveni. In a sense the FDC is then defined by the NRM .What they are and aspire to is NRM minus Museveni.The grievance of the FDC is really that the NRM has not lived up to its original fundamental principles ( i.e FDC wants to be NRM Original) . Apart from personality differences ( humility et al) what is the fundamental point of divergence between the two??
...
written by Maceni, July 10, 2014
@Rajab During the colonial period and immediate post-independence there was very little distinction between anti-Bugandanism and anti-colonialism – remember the Buganda monarch administered the protectorate on behalf of the colonial government. Anti-colonial sentiment was the rallying point for nationalism. So In a sense Obote’s “finishing’ of Mutesa was a triumph over colonial machinery- a very nationalist sentiment at the time. The villager in Bukedi expressed anti- imperialism by resisting the authority of Ganda Chiefs – which was obviously was laden with anti- Buganda sentiment –how could one possibly expect he would distinguish the two?!!
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 11, 2014
But Obote was serving in the same government as Mutesa. At the time, the prime minister had more powers than the President. Do you want to believe that by "finishing" Mutesa, it was an "anti- imperialist" expression or it was a return to "colonialism proper?" The generalization that Buganda administered the protectorate on behalf of the colonial government is in itself a "hate message." If Buganda was pro-colonialism, why would the colonial administration exile their Kabaka not once but twice? Why was Buganda so vehement on joining the East African Federation since it were the wish of administrators? What is wrong with FDC being anti Museveni? If Museveni was a religion that preached, theft, sectarianism, murder- What would be so wrong with being "anti-Museveni" religion?
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 11, 2014
FDC shares every Ugandan vision which is "anti- poverty, anti- disease and anti ignorance", in its catchword- "one people, one Uganda- One Uganda ...."
...
written by Maceni, July 11, 2014
The facts of past history are always a bitter pill to swallow. Buganda was always pro Buganda and many times that meant doing the colonial government dirty work. It was rewarded by being allowed to acquire territory in other parts of the protectorate - isnt this the ultimate imperialism. You can argue it was pro colonial as long it was not directed towards it. The paradox is precisely in the provision of the machinery of the colonial enterprise elsewhere while resisting it in Buganda. Mutesa felt he was not consulted in proposal to form EA federation - he thought he was a partner of British!! Obviously learnt the hard way Imperialist governments do not have permanent friends.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 12, 2014
Maceni, the pills of History always felt bitter when you were either on the wrong side of History or a victim of that History. I do not know whether this would be the appropriate platform to discuss Buganda's place in the formation of Uganda given the limited space. But I will make references to the Hansard, 26 July,1962 (Uganda Independence Bill). In which the Minister for Colonial Affairs (The Marquess Of Lansdowne) described Buganda's position in such terms, "Buganda, with its central position, with its highly developed system of Government, its Kabaka, and its traditional Council the Lukiko has tended to overshadow the rest of the country." Buganda has continuously been castigated and victimized because of its early development into "statehood."
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 12, 2014
The question of the two lost counties of Buyaga and Bugaggazzi was more of a governance issue than a political settlement. Bunyoro was a vast Kingdom which had been infected with an epidermic. However, at the time Bunyoro was administratively weak to tackle the epidermic. The two counties happen to be nearer the much stronger Buganda than the frailing Bunyoro. Buganda's influence in these two Counties was resounding to the effect that even after the referendum, some communities remained loyal to Buganda. I am not justifying "imperial tendencies" but rather "rationale" in what has been conveniently termed as "political booty."
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 12, 2014
The Munster Commission that handled the federation question was a public commission that consult far and wide. So, mooting that Buganda was not consulted is a false one. contrary, to what Maceni is saying, is that Buganda rejected the East African federation simply because its authority would be in the hands of the White minority, concentrated around the Highlands of Kenya. Last but not least, Buganda could be accused of "corroboration", but that corroboration saw us (Uganda) fast-tracking our Independence before the "rebellious" MAU-MAU in Kenya. Buganda as a region sacrificed a lot for Uganda- in form of land and infrastructure - providing Shelter for administrative units but it all seems that what these efforts generated was anything but love.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 12, 2014
I can only equate the Buganda- Uganda relationship to an estranged marriage where the woman is the breadwinner yet it is the man who makes all the decisions. As Mutesa put food on the table the decisions were with Obote to make. The only unfair part about this, is that it has gone on far too-long and it has turned into a relay- race, where the mantle is passed-on from one brutal President to another- From Obote1 to Idd Amin to Obote11 to Museveni. My only hope is that, maybe this will only prove the "resilience" of Buganda.
...
written by Maceni, July 13, 2014
You are correct - this maybe a conversation for another forum. I greatly admire pre-colonial developments of the state of Buganda--every Ugandan should -- Buganda is a pan-ethnic society from its very foundations with probably one of the most inclusive cultural dispositions in Africa. However you spend too much time trying to white-wash the instrumentalist role they had in fomenting the colonial enterprise. They are a good example of Victims who become perpetrators, and who later in the late colonial period towards independence realized their victim status and along with other Ugandans pushed for independence.
...
written by Rajab Kakyama, July 13, 2014
Thank you Maceni, we might not agree on everything here but it would be wrong if I thought I could "white-wash" and rewrite History. With further reading and research, we are able to disarm prejudice and stereo-type and appreciate the "truth" as the only logic. In this particular case I would recommend Professor Mahmood Mamdani & Onyango's book (Uganda) and Uganda's History and Constitutionalism by G.W. Kanyeyihamba they could shade more light about the subject.
...
written by mukasa, July 13, 2014
Opio its not tribalism its wanting to work with people one has grown to trust as a result knowing them intimately due to shared schooling,family ties ....who for most people above 40 years are usually tribesmates as most of them went to primary and secondary schools in their tribal areas and at university usually associated with obs and ogs of thosr same schools and if no shared education background then trust cud be assumed of a relative,villagemate or someone referred by someone in circle of trust who most likely will be tribesmate....its not a tribal issue but an issue of trust maybe in the future due to more tribally mixed schools new circles of trust will be formed outside tribal circles.

Write comment

busy
 
 
 
 

NTV Newsnight

 
COMMENT