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Africa and the curse of the ICC

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How the International Criminal Court is seeking to usurp our sovereignty and why progressive Africa should reject it

Last week, the African Union summit in Addis Ababa resolved to ask the UN Security Council to defer the case against President Uhuru Kenyatta of Kenya at the ICC. It is unprecedented to put a serving president of a sovereign nation on trial. If Uhuru and his deputy William Ruto are convicted, ICC will have overturned the freely expressed will of the Kenyan people.

I harbor a heavy dose of skepticism about all forms of foreign “aid” to Africa – whether it is money to end poverty, soldiers to keep the peace, courts to ensure justice, humanitarians to feed the hungry, doctors to treat the sick, journalists to report on our problems, activists to fight for our human rights, experts to advise on policies and institutions, economists to “free” our markets and diplomats to democratise our politics. This is because these foreign “saviors” have their own interests, which often conflict with our own.

Secondly, even if these “saviors” were genuine, they lack the necessary knowledge to appreciate the complexities, idiosyncrasies and nuances of our situation to offer a meaningful and durable solution.

In their altruism, Western “saviors” come to Africa armed with abstract notions of justice or democracy that work well in their societies (because of specific historical circumstances) but which, when transplanted unto our reality, turn out to be utterly disastrous.

The main problem is not that African countries signed the Rome Statute which created the ICC. That is the small part. The bigger part is that the UN Security Council can cause the indictment of leaders of nations that are not signatories. Sudan is not a signatory to the Rome Statute but its president Omar El Bashir has been indicted by the ICC and an arrest warrant issued against him.

Although the UN Security Council has power to indict anyone, the ICC (like the UN) is not organised along democratic principles. Of the five permanent members of the Security Council who have power to veto any decision or decide whether someone should be indicted or not and power to defer their trial every year ad infinitum, only two (Britain and France) are signatories. The USA, Russia and China are not. In other words we have nations enforcing an international agreement they are not signatories to.

I am even inclined to agree with many critics of our leaders in Africa. All too often, they have let us down. They steal public resources to enrich themselves, they kill innocent civilians whose only crime may be to express honest opinions, they obstruct the will of the people through vote-rigging and they undermine the independence of the courts. Of course the reality is much more nuanced. But even if this was true, it is our responsibility to organise politically to liberate ourselves.

In all this discourse we are presented as helpless victims of bad leadership to be saved by a kind international community (the West). We are not active participants in the struggles to emancipate ourselves. Instead, we are presented as passive spectators in the efforts to shape our destiny. We just sit by idly waiting for international charity.

Sadly, in supporting ICC and other such Western movements to liberate us, many African elites accept this presentation. Confident and proud Africans need to reject this presentation. Our problems may seem big but with our determination, we can overcome them. We don’t need anyone to save us. That is our own task.

At its core, the ICC seeks to undermine our sovereignty in the name of an abstract standard of justice enforced by the West. A nation can have sovereignty without democracy but it cannot have democracy without sovereignty. ICC’s founding philosophy rests on the assumption that there are civilized nations (the West) that enjoy a superior moral standing and are therefore entitled to enforce standards of decent behavior on the uncivilized nations.

This claim is not new. Colonialism was presented in exactly similar ways i.e. as aimed at our own good – to bring Christianity and civilization, to end the tyranny of our customs and the despotism of our chiefs, to stop slavery and slave trade i.e. to liberate us from ourselves.

The colonialists did not invent these ills. They were real. However, they exploited them to divide us and to promote their own interests. Seventy years of colonial rule did not introduce civilized government in Africa or economic prosperity or broad based education.

Instead, by 1950 there were only two universities in Africa South of the Sahara and North of the Limpopo – Makerere and Ibadan – with a total enrolment of less than 100 students studying for a degree in a sub-continent of 46 nations. Contrary to popular assumptions, it is post independence Africa, with all its failures, that has opened education opportunities for our people. Today, Africa is building the most important resource any society can command – human capital.

The ICC is largely a Western court. Its real role is to be an instrument of Western powers to punish those leaders of poor countries who do not serve Western interests. Any African president pursuing Western interests will remain immune to the ICC regardless of crimes they commit against their people.

It is possible most of these nations signed the Rome Statute out of naivety – just like our chiefs and kings of old signed “protection” agreements with the British and the French only to discover they had surrendered their independence and sovereignty. The road to domination is often paved with good intentions and its realisation comes by the creep, rather than the gallop.

This lesson was best told by Lubengula, King of the Ndebele in modern day Zimbabwe after he had been defeated by the British whom he had initially collaborated with and signed an agreement of mutual assistance: “Have you ever seen a chameleon catch a fly,” he said on his death-bed, “It moves slowly and motionlessly and when it is in easy reach, it darts and the fly disappears.

I am the fly and the British are the chameleon.” Kabaka Mwanga of Buganda, Jaja of Opobo – literally every Africa king and chief who entered an agreement with Europeans in the late 19th century discovered this treachery. That is why Africa should be suspicious when the same people claim to love us more than we love ourselves.

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Comments (48)Add Comment
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written by Staff Gen. Adam Kifalisso, October 19, 2013
Andrew how do you compare Ugandan courts to ICC ? Do you think m7 elected Judges can delivery justice against their master ? Africans will seek to run to ICC as long African rulers stop to interfere in judiciary and dissemination of justice
When Colonialism is Comparable to Despotism
written by Ocheto, October 19, 2013
This is the familiar kind of apologia from the despots and their sycophants. It was proffered against colonialism and it is now being proffered in support of home-grown despotism. We have come full circle. When these so-called leaders, who slaughter their people to ascend to and stay power signed onto the terms creating the court did they not understand what they were getting into? Any jurisprudence believes that ignorance is no defense. The lofty talk of sovereignty would make a smidget of sense if these despots were not actually committing these crimes against their people. Moreover there is no sovereignty to talk of if you are persecuted or dead.
When Colonialism is Comparable to Despotism
written by Ocheto, October 19, 2013
The more interesting and pertinent question is: why have people who enthusiastically embraced the idea of an international court become its ardent opponents? The answer is their own lies have caught up with them. The idea of a court was good in the abstract but is now unapalatable in reality especially for rulers who live above the law. This is the first time they have been subjected to any strictures of any kind. If not ICC who will reign in the tyrants? For the people being killed what difference does this nonsensical rhetoric mean? Zilch. The same despots who blame the west work with the west when it suits them. Even Kagame too is now anti-ICC and yet when the court came for General Bosco Ntaganda he complied and handed him to the court.
Becoming a turd!
written by Steven Nsubuga, October 20, 2013
This article once again exposes the disingenuous peddler of dictatorship misleading Africans into a bottomless abyss. Poor Africans! Exposed to all, masquerading as journalists, intellectuals, politicians, freedom fighters and now shamelessly defending dictatorship in the name of sovereignty?? The starving masses are denied emancipation from the grip of tin pot despots because of sovereignty? If indeed this is true, please denounce the UN economic sanctions that helped free S.Africa from Apartheid. How come those black SAfricans sought foreign help? Goodness they compromised their sovereignty.
A turd
written by Steven Nsubuga, October 20, 2013
Are we really different from others? How complex is my demand of freedom hard for Europeans or Americans to comprehend? I submit to Mr. Mwenda that the converging interests of people the world over are far more important than their differences. We all seek freedom, education, health, basic needs and prosperity. How is that different from what other cultures seek? Is that so hard to comprehend? And who can better help us reach that horizon than the Americans and Europeans who got there before us? The world has become so interdependent that the sovereignty argument doesn't fly.
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written by Steven Nsubuga, October 20, 2013
Lastly, if Mr. M7 and Mwenda are going to use that argument, better be mindful that the same argument can be used inside Uganda/Africa by different ethnic groups.
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written by Diane Kenneth, October 20, 2013
Andrew, you've often stooped so low; but I think this is the lowest you have stooped! I don't have time to write a lot; but just three points/observations: 1) would you have written the same article the way you have if you were one of those Kenyans who lost their dear ones during the riots? 2) You praise Africa Universities; but you ran to the West to be educated! 3) Your state: "It is possible most of these nations signed the Rome Statute out of naivety...." how laughable you can get; our leaders are naive indeed! This is not the Andrew who was a defender of human rights! How money can make a man mad!
Andrew you are mixing up issues
written by Tina, October 20, 2013
Matters of the ICC & African leaders are not easy its just that in Ug we r free compared to states like Dafur,CAR Somaila etc laws were were created as a deterrent measure. why is it that the ICC did not interdict leaders like Moi,Mandela,Rwalings,Kibaki Chissano etc to me ICC should clarify on,
1. The yardstick for interdicting leaders is it based on verified facts or its based on reports from activists who are sponsored by the rich counties.
2. How does the ICC categorize the war against terror coz all wars lead to loss of lives whether in Africa or in the Arab world.
3. When an African leader is fighting rebels threatening his country why does it look wrong in the eyes of the ICC?
HAS M9 &M7 THINKING MERGED
written by mukisa, October 20, 2013
Every day that passes M9 reasons more like M7, is this indoctrination or carrot magnetism or midlife intellectual crisis, or because 8 that separated their names has been financially erased. (We don’t need anyone to save us. That is our own task). African leaders were accountable to God alone, until the ICC came along to stand between them and God and in so doing check their impunity. Taylor would be waiting for Gods verdict only but for ICC. The same way you have interests while practicing journalism, is the same way the west has interests while aiding Africa, so that neither wholesomely nullifies everything you do or they do. This article only shows that M9 can try to hard sell oil to the Arabs, given the motivation.
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written by mpwabe, October 20, 2013
Justice is more thn laws&facts. Is the ICC perceived as fair? Are such crimes only in Africa? Bush and Blair attacked Iraq on the pretext of WMD, how many did they find? how many civilians died? Sh'd we say tht only Uhuru and Ruto caused all the deaths in Kenya? How about Assad in Syria? Any self respecting African should be wary of any western intervention in our problems, if history has taught us anything, it is that the west is not 2 be trusted. The Arabs know this well, its the reason they don't participate in all these western programs? Politicizing this issue is really wat is disappointing, evrythin is seen thru the lens of politics. M7 and his cronies won't be here forever, he will go, but what will be left of our sovereignty? what will be left of our Uganda? and our Africa?
dictators marketing guru
written by mukisa, October 20, 2013
It looks as if this cause marketing article was commissioned by some dictators, because they surely love sovereignty over democracy to use impunity to crash opposing political opinions. Having the support of the majority does not exonerate you of your criminality, Hitler was popular and had majority support at home, but he was a criminal, period. M7 regularly tells Ugandans its criminals who fear the police. The same sovereignty Mwenda is elevating over democracy, is the main obstacle to the AU attaining its major objective. Mwenda once a revered journalist is now a media mercenary.
Africa under the curse of its lack of focus for the future
written by Denis Musinguzi, October 21, 2013
Andrew makes one noble point: Africa must determine her future, find a solution to her innumerable problems, and steadily move towards that future. Unfortunately, Africa has failed at this grand strategic focus, not because of ICC, but shamefully due to her lack of focus. African leaders were never coerced to accent to the ICC statute, but did so when it suited their selfish interests. Now that its gallows are open for them, they're scampering like directionless lumpens. How do we deal with leaders who are ready to loot and kill, and not to account? Must impunity and plunder be tolerated in the name of sovereignty? How do we resist external influence without internal sense of direction?
business dev'p manager
written by Jeff abiriga, October 21, 2013
True, i confer with you on the so called foreign Aid that is given to us in the name of Helping poor Africans.
As an African it is incumbent upon us to fight this policy of begging from these foreign powers who in the
end super- impose conditions on our leaders to sign agreements that only benefit them in the long run.
However, African leaders should desist from the tyranny they inflict on there citizens, then the ICC will
be rendered useless.
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written by Denis Musinguzi, October 21, 2013
Andrew, we all know you enjoy some rare access to most African heads of state and foreign dignitaries. Could you think of a forum of apolitical actors who are committed to sanitizing Africa, in form of a think tank or whatever the name, to begin championing African revolution in very practical and discernible terms?. How long shall we allow to passively act in this internal loot and external onslaught by choosing to keep quiet? Wouldn't our mighty elder, Andrew Mujuni Mwenda, deserve a far-reaching legacy than these detached journalism commentaries? I begin to question why I should even dedicate time to this forum as we keep recycling our problems, not solutions to them.
ICC RACISM IN JUSTICE SKIN
written by derek, October 21, 2013
Its true a lot of our black african leaders need to face justice and unfortunately most of the times we are unable to punish them for their misdeeds but this shouldn't blind us to the inherent racism in the international community believing in the inferiority of black people Whereby they believe we are childish,stupid,corrupt,sex obsessed,lack forward thinking/planning that we are blind to our short commings that only them can save us from our current predicaments.

If the ICC is so good for humanity. Why should US refuse to submit itself to it. One could argue that the high gun death rates in US itself is a form of political violence to which..
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written by derek, October 21, 2013
...its victims will never get justice in the american courts. as gun manufacturers have corrupted the Congress and judiciary through so called lobbying that americans too could benefit from the ICC justice. Or even so many other non african nations which have internal conflicts whose victims too never get justice in those nations.Maybe Its time we resume nkrumah and other pan africanist struggle for black people dignity. African solutions for african problems Gacaca, Mato oput and other such african approaches to conflicts in soon to be great continent.
A NEW AFRICAN PATRIOTISM?
written by OJA, October 21, 2013
Mr Andrew Mwenda, you are partly right in your arguments and partly wrong. Here is why. Truly the ICC seems to have a lopsided standard of applying justice when it comes to its execution without fear or favour. On the other side you are actually wrong to also opine that African states must have their sovereignty respected and so its leaders must not be the target of that suspicion-shrouded court seated at the Hague in a European country. In order for African leaders to be relevant they MUST clean their house and as someone said have credible, working, independent, no-nonsense courts of law that administer justice beyond suspicion. They MUST promote democracy, MUST stop killing and bulldozing their own citizens otherwise this apparently new African patriotism is a sham!
Final result
written by Marvin ya Kuku, October 21, 2013
I am only interested in the final result. If our referees cannot handle serious matches and we have to import some from Hague then so be it. As long as the ref knows the rules and is fair then what is your problem. Those hooligans who buy cheap football tickets, come to the stadium drunk quarelling about racism, sovereignity and God knows what should be given kibokos and then tear gassed. On this issue I think we all agree we can get a local Police man named Kayihura to do the Kiboko squad and tear gas thing. Thank God for the ICC
Mwneda's journey from hegemony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
I have spent nearly 3 months without adding my thread to this petty analysis from A.M in support of his naked African chiefs but this time it was horrendous. This article is a true manifestation of what happens to poets when they start writing in exchange of money and power.
Mwenda's jouney from hegmony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
To Mwenda, it matters now to persuade the crowd than not to convince people of truth and this article is an imprint in his journey from hegemony to subjugation – the same fate that the sophists in the ancient Greece suffered in their promotion of idealism and subjectivism that appealed to unthinking horde – but it is not an approach that serves the foundation of common life. Time is out for those who think they can fall into pigsty and still come out smelling like rose as long as they have control over media houses and are issuing pay checks to celebrated regional journalists
Mwenda's jouney from hegmony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
Having said that let me begin by correcting AM’s wrong impression about the west and foreign aid. To begin with, if mwenda “harbor a heavy dose of skepticism about all forms of foreign “aid” to Africa as he alleges then he shouldn’t be the same journalist stereotyping Rwanda’s economic and development “miracles” whose 70% of financing is largely aid. Granted, aid has imperfections but it has worked for countries that have put in place systems to absorb such aid not like in Uganda where aid ends up on personal accounts of individuals rather than the government like what happened recently in the office of the Prime Minister (OPM).
Mwenda's Journey from hegmony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
Having said that let me begin by correcting AM’s wrong impression about the west and foreign aid. To begin with, if mwenda “harbors a heavy dose of skepticism about all forms of foreign “aid” to Africa as he alleges then he shouldn’t be the same journalist stereotyping Rwanda’s economic and development “miracles” whose 70% of financing is largely aid.
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written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
Granted, aid has imperfections but it has worked for countries that have put in place systems to absorb such aid not like in Uganda where aid ends up on personal accounts of individuals rather than the government like what happened recently in the office of the Prime Minister (OPM).
Mwenda's Jouney from Hegmony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
Again, it fallacious to tell the unthinking crowd those western notions of democracy and justice are applied in Africa in their abstract form. All politically independent countries in Africa are governed by their own constitution and laws. Therefore all notions applied in domains of democracy and laws are consultative in nature, after all the will of implementation lies within the African governments and their people. In circumstances where westerners scholars lack necessary knowledge to appreciate the complexities between the west and Africa, they should be given chance to learn after all we are all seekers rather than possessors of knowledge.
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written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
There are common denominators in humanity, whether black of white; we deserve good governance, our rights and freedoms need to be respected, our leaders must be accountable and we all deserve justice. These and many others are not exclusive to the west but to their entire humanity across the world.
Mwenda's journey from hegmony to subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
You see it is easy for paupers to demolish an old building however strong it may be than constructing a new house even if the new house was to be semi-permanent. The rhetoric to withdraw from ICC seems to be clear than what should be put in place to replace the ICC. The circumstances that influenced some of African countries to join ICC are still alive and kicking, they are with us and ICC is so far the best institution to handle cases of such magnitudes considering the economic and political power that they indictees (accused) tend to have. At least I know about Taylor and Uhuru Kenyata.
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written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
The confident and proud Africans that Mwneda’s appeal is directed to, are those Africans whose livelihood depend on corruption, kill their own people, harbor terrorism and rig elections. But if you doubt ICC, then let AU put its own tribunal to handle war crimes and crimes against humanity and see the real character of African leaders – to kill and maim those who oppose them.
Mwenda's journey from Hegmony to Subjugation
written by Mushime Moses, October 21, 2013
Question: So if ICC is there to punish African leaders who do not serve western interest, is it in African interest for its leaders to commit war crimes and crimes against humanity? It bizarre that those who have chance to represent Africa on global forum like Andrew Mwenda can think like this! By the way, where was Mwenda during Taylor’s trial? William Ruto and Uhuru Kenyatta were not deputy president and president respectively not until 2013. Remember they were indicted d in 2010. We may debate on the approach taken in this case but it’s true that there were crimes against humanity in Kenya during the 2007 post-election violence.
I concur
written by Steven Nsubuga, October 21, 2013
Mr. Mushime Moses, I concur with your poignant observation.
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written by Diane Kenneth, October 21, 2013
If it was not for the fear of ICC, M7 would have killed Mwenda long time ago. Who doesn't remember the days Mwenda being "beaten to toe the line" he is now toeing?
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written by mulema, October 22, 2013
Andrew Kayiira's ghost disagrees with Mwenda's notion of sovereignty supremacy over democracy, because he was extinguished without justice ever meted to the conspirators on earth.
news reporter
written by muvunyi timothy , October 22, 2013
No ICC is for a humanitarian case not for Africa. African habors humanity not Kenyan or any other African leaders wanted or suspecting to be wanted by the ICC.
VICTIM
written by kanimba, October 22, 2013
In a way Mwenda is a victim of a despotic regime that will just not change, he tried criticising the regime to effect change with no results and has scars to show for his effort, then decided to fall in love with his captor.The thing was, if he cant bring change, let him change instead and benefits from the rewards that come with collaboration. Mwenda metarmorphosed from a resistor to a collaborator, evolutionary as a way of surrender, that way he can be seen as a victim of a patronage system gone amok not out of choice.
Mad Moses and Adam
written by winnie, October 22, 2013
The Photosynthesis generation of Adam and Mushime moses can go and hang there are many trees in Uganda. Museveni has done alot for Uganda did you see him at his best as usual officiating at the opening of company after company,Business after Business may he be blessed.Ugandans these days don't even see the need of traveling abroad M7 brought to ug all the exotic cuisines, we even eat Apples,Grapes Berries chocolate ( Remember the likes of Adam and Mushime moses used to see them in movies).even escalators,lifts,snow are in Uganda what more do we need?
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written by winnie, October 22, 2013
In USA the govt almost shut down coz it was being led by an African they wanted to embarrass us as usual i even suspect they hide some documents away from Obama so that he blunders.WHITES NEVER TRUST US The ICC is just a scarecrow even animals in the garden no longer fear scarecrows people like Mushime up to now prefer washing toilets in Europe than in Africa thinking that the toilets there are more sophisticated yet they all have the same stuff man better wake up and make Africa a better place.
It is African's Using the ICC!
written by Maceni, October 23, 2013
The ICC and the west are off course serving their own interests - what did you expect?!! The idea that true justice can be gotten from the same machinery that stifles us politically and economically is an exercise in futility. For the most part the court is as instrumentalist to western interests as it is to other internal political interests in African countries.Have you stopped think that maybe its the African people using the ICC as the protest machinery to check despotism.Most of those cases were refered to the ICC by Africans!!
It is African's Using the ICC!
written by Maceni, October 23, 2013
It is baffling how this sudden African brotherhood emerges- It was clearly absent when people in northern uganda were being massacred by their own government and rebels in equal measure. Silent when Rwandans were massacred next door. Participant in the biggest loss of life Africa has seen in a single war in the DRC. As long as the ICC serves an instrumentalist role in checking the power of Despotic rulers who daily try to rob Africans of their sovereign rights- I say it does more to preserve the sovereignty of the African people than any internal government machinery.
And...
written by Omeros, October 23, 2013
Maceni wins the bout on a technical knockout. Deft, efficient and brutal.
Mr
written by Peter, October 26, 2013
Andrew we are helpless no question about that. Kenyatta committed the offences before becoming president and he first appeared before that court when he was only a Minister not a President. And what do you think will happen in the absence of such establishments.? The Museveni's of this world will just start chopping people in day light. do not antegonise ICC, we know your academic you can argue, but this is a very sensitive subject. You may never appreciate the role of the immune system not until its removed like what happens when HIV progresses to AIDS and disables the immune system. Andrew so many people in that country take your opinion serious, so please as you move towards your forties where more and more people will take your opinions so serious its better you start getting serious.
Africa and the curse of ICC
written by Anthony Bayega, October 27, 2013
Andrew I agree completely in the most. I hate that Africans have given all hope as that they can solve their own problems. By handing our problems to the West we are as a man sitting hungry on the ocean shore and waiting for someone to give them a fish. We need to learn how to fish and ICC denies us this opportunity. If the ICC wants to solve these issues then let them come and set local courts, have their and our judges and lawyers so we can be equal participants in solving our problems while learning the process. We all need to ask for this.
Lagome
written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
With the greatest respect Andrew, you got it so horribly wrong this time round like we all so occassionally. From the onset you referred to oranges and mangoes thereby completely using the wrong arguments to criticise the ICC. First courts do not necessarily operate on democracy execpt when passing it verdict. By stating that the ICC (like the UN) is not organised along democratic principles, what democratic principles were you referring to? That ICC officials including judges be elected by universal suffrage?By alledging that ICC seeks to undermine our sovereignty in the name of an abstract standard of justice enforced by the West you grossly failed to appreciate the underlying principles of the ICC.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
The justice being expended by the ICC is fundamentally the same as those expended by the courts in Uganda if you compare the procedures of the court and the penalties that it metes out. If indeed the ICC was designed to undermine African sovereignty, explain the inclusion of crimes of aggression which the US vehemently opposed? Would a someone advocate for a law to criminalise their ill intentions? And by extension, would the west push for ICC yet its absence would be ideal for their mischief? The claim that the ICC largely western and a tool to punish leaders of poor countries is another rather unfortunate and unfounded assertion.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
Africa constitutes the largest bloc, with majority of judges I think, the President is Asian, the prosecutor is Africa and except the geographical location of the court on what basis is the ICC largely western?. There no radically new principles of law in the ICC statute. It is basically a compendium and amalgamation of several international law principles notably in Geneva conventions. One has to refer to the nature of cases that the ICC handles and the standard of proof required to realise accusations against it is very unfair.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
By any measure of imagination your statement that it is possible most of these nations signed the Rome Statute out of naivety – just like our chiefs and kings of old signed "protection" agreements is astounding. If a 21st centuary African can not decipher what they are signing, then they deserve to be exploited to extinction! If African leaders do not not want the intervention of ICC, just improve your governance and legal systems and the ICC will die a natural death.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
ICC doesn't invite itself and most cases we referred to it by the same leaders criticising it. Even in Kenya, the suspects sang let's not be vague, ICC we go. And when they signed, the document waived presidential immunity. This escapism of sovereignty, racism is just burying one's head in the sand. Selective justice is worse in national courts. There is a point in eliminating referral of cases by UN security council but it is the state parties (including African countries) who inderted it there in the first place, not the UN.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
For God's sake let us reason with our heads and criticise based on facts and offer alternative solutions. Andrew it is surprising that you never, not even is passing, mentioned the victims of atrocities. Do not doubt me - I desire for complete independence of Africa but our leaders have directly through collaboration or covertly through bad governance hindered this dream.
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written by Lagome, October 28, 2013
For lack of time allow me debunk only a few misstatements: If the ICC is so good for humanity. Why should US refuse to submit itself to it. Illegality and war is a major hallmark of America's foreign policy and they could not afford to be party to ICC. For a long time US was never a party to the convention on children. In short US should never be considered as a shining example of rule of law and human rights outside its borders. It is outrageous to blame ICC for Rwanda 1994, it might have prevented other genocides instead. That Bush, Blair or Assad were/are not prosecuted hence we should also tolerate African rulers impunity is such twisted reasoning devoid of any grain of wisdom. This hatred for anything western is sometimes so shallow as to border racism.
Mr
written by kabayekka, November 13, 2013
Seriously speaking human rights is everybody's business these days. Europe got their lessons on this when Hitler started the WW2 just after the WW1 had just ended. Interesting that Hitler's henchmen pleaded not guilty to all that what happened during the terrible wars. One cannot see how the whole world can keep quiet as more dodgy wars continue to inspire African Nationalism.

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